Keynote speech 1: Dr. Evangelos Bekiaris | Director General, Hellenic Institute of Transport (HIT) – Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH)

Astract

Prior to ad hoc adoption of automated mobility on city and country level across Europe, further research and pre-deployment activities are anticipated tackling with acceptance, technological, ethical, regulatory, operational and business challenges that have to be fully addressed. Cities across Europe are progressively participating in initiatives that are allowing them to explore their readiness towards this direction. Connection and cooperativeness of all types of autonomous vehicles – involved in passenger and freight mobility both – with the infrastructure and all other road users through a wide, evolving and complentary spectrum of technologies (LTE 4G/5G, G5, IoT), ensuring interoperability and security while responding primarily at the dynamic context of traffic safety and its criticality constitutes the key technological challenge. Full automation (SAE Level 4, 4+) through remote operation of fleets and collaboration with the Traffic Management Centres Strategy Managing systems is already validated in a series of European sites. Artificial Intelligence and Big Data are deployed to provide personalized services to the autonomous vehicles and the road users in a massive way. Dedicated Human Machine Interfaces for “drivers”, passengers and operators are being studied. Standardised homologation on a European level is key to wide deployment. Joined European efforts are disposed towards broad field pre-deployment with big fleets in different traffic contexts (urban, peri-urban, rural, motorways under mixed traffic conditions or dedicated lanes), confronting with different traffic scenarios and operating under different speed ranges and environmental conditions adhering to fleet sharing Demand Response Transport (DRT) and first-last mile business models and Automation as a Service. Finally, drivers, operators and road users need to get prepared and trained and Cities need to recognize those soft measures, initiatives and policies that will best accommodate the smooth and cost-efficient integration of automated mobility in the transport system currently standing in them.

Short bio

Dr. Evangelos Bekiaris, PhD on Mechanical Engineering NTUA, has been elected as Researcher of the Hellenic Institute of Transport (HIT) of the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH) in 2001; being its Director General as of 2016. Since 1992 he has participated in over 120 research projects, in 40 of which at the role of Overall or Technical Coordinator. He’s the National representative of Greece in the H2020 Transport Committee since 2014 and President of the European Conference of Transport Research Institutes (ECTRI) and the European Rail Research Network of Excellence (EURNEX) since 2019. In the past he’s also been the President of the European Associations FERSI (on road safety) and HUMANIST (on Human Factors in Transport).

Keynote speech 2: Prof. Nikolas Geroliminis | Associate Professor, ‘Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

Astract

Human mobility in congested city centers is a complex dynamical system with high density of population, many transport modes to compete for limited available space and many operators that try to efficiently manage different parts of this system. New emerging modes of transportation, such as ride-hailing and on-demand services, and new technologies, such as autonomous vehicles, create additional opportunities, but also more complexity. The new era of sharing information and ‘big data world’ has raised our expectation to make mobility more predictable and controllable through a better utilization of existing resources and capacity. The primary motivation of this talk is to study the spatiotemporal relation of congested links in large networks, develop new advancements in the Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram, observe congestion propagation from a macroscopic perspective, identify the effect of multimodal interactions in network capacity and finally design network-level control strategies to improve multimodal mobility. Investigating the clustering problem over time help us reveal the hidden information during the process of congestion formation and dissolution. In this framework, we will be able to chase where congestion originates and how traffic management systems affect its formation and the time it finishes. Different control strategies are developed based on principles of optimization control theory.

 

Short bio

Prof. Nikolas Geroliminis is an Associate Professor at EPFL and the head of the Urban Transport Systems Laboratory (LUTS). Before joining EPFL he was an Assistant Professor on the faculty of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota. He has a diploma in Civil Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) and a MSc and Ph.D. in civil engineering from University of California, Berkeley. He is an Associate Editor for Transportation Research part C, IEEE Transactions on ITS and Transportation Science. He is a member of the Transportation Research Board’s Traffic Flow Theory Committee. His research interests focus primarily on urban transportation systems, traffic flow theory and control, public transportation and on-demand transport, car sharing, Optimization and Large Scale Networks. He is a recipient of the ERC Starting Grant METAFERW: Modeling and controlling traffic congestion and propagation in large-scale urban multimodal networks. Among his recent initiatives is the creation of an open-science large-scale dataset of naturalistic urban trajectories of half a million vehicles that have been collected by one-of-a-kind experiment by a swarm of drones ( https://open-traffic.epfl.ch).

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